Browsing All Posts filed under »Paleolithic Era«

On “Becoming Human” – Part 2

February 24, 2010

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LINK TO: Part 1 WARNING: This post is jargontastic.  I’ve included lots of Wikipedia links, but it still may be difficult for readers unfamiliar with certain concepts or unaccustomed to my blather.  If this is a greater challenge than you find enjoyable, then do skip it.  I hope to return to these concepts in a […]

On “Becoming Human” – Part 1

January 26, 2010

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Part three of the Throwing Spear Saga is still coming.  I promise.  But … on Sunday I watched part one of the Nova documentary “Becoming Human“.  Part one was entitled “First Steps” and it seems to tie very neatly into my own speculations from the Ancient Computing Revolution post. The main question that “First Steps” […]

Ancient Computing Revolution

January 18, 2010

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NOTE: Don’t let the title fool you.  This is a post about the nature of humanity. Humans have built computing machinery for thousands of years, but in the 1800s an incredible transition began: programmability.  Born for the purpose of more flexibly automating looms, the technology of machines that can execute arbitrary lists of instructions was […]

Throwing Spear – Part 2

January 12, 2010

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LINK: Part 1 IN THIS PART: I’ll talk about types of spears and rotational mechanics. First let me say thank you to the numerous people who directed my attention to the very important invention of the atlatl.  My intention is to build a hand-thrown spear, but it’s certainly important to learn about the atlatl.  So […]

Throwing Spear – Part 1

January 4, 2010

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Instead of writing another huge post, I’m going to cut this one into several pieces which will be posted throughout the week.  This may turn out to be a better format in general. IN THIS POST: I’ll introduce the purpose and scope of the current discussion.  I’ll also introduce some concepts that will help with […]

Old Stone Age

December 20, 2009

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In the 1820s a Danish archeologist named Christian Jürgensen Thomsen divided prehistory into three ages.  He did this to help him classify artifacts for the Danish Royal Commission for the Preservation and Collection of Antiquities.  He picked out a trait easy to discern: What are the artifacts made of?  That’s how we ended up with the oft-heard […]

Plant, Animal, and Stone

November 24, 2009

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Did you miss me?  So did I.  In this post, I’ll talk about the museum I visited the weekend before last and about flintknapping. As I said, the weekend was a lot of fun.  My father took me to visit the Connecticut Museum of Mining & Mineral Science in Kent, CT.  There a man named […]